614.836.0100

Account & Fraud


Reporting

If you suspect that your account has been compromised or experience security-related events, please contact us immediately at 614-836-0100 or out of area at 800-241-4575. A Member Service Representative will get your call to the person responsible for handling your issue.

Safety Tips

Safety Tips

Please update your mobile number with your credit union. To protect your account, we monitor unusual ATM, debit and credit card usage for possible fraudulent activity. We may need to contact you regarding certain activities on your account, such as a sudden change in location or an unusual string of purchases from your normal pattern use. If we need to reach you, we will not ask for your card or account number, but may ask you to verify a specific transaction.

  • Please keep us up-to-date with your current mobile and home phone numbers and contact information. This helps for quick notification.
  • If you will be traveling in the United States for an extended period of time, contact us prior to your departure.  We will note your account to make our monitoring more flexible during your travel or vacation time.
  • Card access is limited outside of the United States.  If you will be traveling to a foreign country, please call Card Services at 614-836-0100 for further information.

NOTICE: If you are contacted to verify specific transactions that relates to fraud detection on your debit or credit card, you should only be asked to verify a specific transaction as "yes" it was your transaction, or "no" it was not your transaction. You should not be asked for your personal account information, social security number, or card information. You should never provide this information to unknown callers.  If you have questions about such a call, please contact us directly at 614-836-0100.

We encourage all members to monitor their accounts regularly and to advise us immediately if they have transactions that are not their activity.

Tips for Avoiding Credit Card Fraud
Tips for Avoiding Credit Card Fraud

With nearly 38,000 complaints logged in 2015, credit card fraud ranks as the second most common form of identity theft, trailing only tax- or wage-related fraud, according to the Federal Trade Commission.

It can take many forms, including:

  • Scammers who try to sucker you into giving up credit card info over the phone.
  • E-mail phishing.
  • Skimmers – devices hidden in the mouths of card slots at gas pumps, ATMs and even restaurants to steal card info.

Nothing but healthy skepticism can save you from falling for a slick hustler. But advances in technology are designed to better protect consumers against credit card fraud when making purchases in person.

EMV cards

Though they've been used widely for years overseas, EMV cards are relatively new in the U.S. They still have the thick black band on the back, so they can continue to act like the “magstripe” cards that people have been carrying in their wallets and purses for decades. The brainy component is the chip on the front.

When inserted into an EMV reader, the chip generates a unique, encrypted transaction code, or token. When it reaches your bank, it is decrypted to verify your account and authorize the payment.

By comparison, magstripes use easily cloned static information. In the U.K., where EMVs have been in use more than a decade, the switch cut fraud by more than two-thirds.

Bear in mind that EMVs are no safer than magstripes when you're buying online or giving credit card info to someone over the phone. And for now, most gas pump slots aren't equipped with EMV readers.

Mobile payment services

So-called “mobile wallets” or “e-wallets” use the same kind of token technology as EMV cards. The difference is that instead of pulling out your card, you tap or scan your smartphone at retail checkout counters.

Depending on the smartphone pay system, you may need to enter a PIN or scan your fingerprint to complete a transaction. With Apple, Android and Samsung Pay, you're assigned a substitute card number that's unique to the phone and tethered to your credit card number.

Using your smartphone or tablet adds another layer of security, because a hacker would need to have both the device and its password.

Smart cards

This developing technology consolidates many credit cards into one, doing away with the need to carry a wallet full of plastic, and reducing your risk of dropping or leaving behind a card that someone else could find and misuse.

Smart cards are about the same size as a standard credit or debit card. You upload your various cards' information (usually with the help of a matching app on your phone), and can then toggle between them from the face of the smart card. When it's time to pay, you pick the one you want and swipe, insert into an EMV slot, or hold the smart card up to a card reader, depending on your provider.

Companies in this space include Coin, Plastc and Swyp. Some use a third-party service to verify your identity by asking questions only you would be able to answer, such as previous addresses, family members and other information.

Monitor your credit card statements

It's a good idea to check your accounts regularly. If you see charges you know you didn't make or otherwise don't recognize, contact the card issuer to clarify and, if necessary, dispute them. You may also want to set up a fraud alert or request a credit freeze.

Online transactions

If you're buying online, make sure you're on a secure site before you enter sensitive information. Look for the https:// or a padlock at the start of the web address.

It's also wise to avoid accessing bank or personal finance sites using public Wi-Fi, which can be a haven for hackers.

© Copyright 2016 NerdWallet, Inc. All Rights Reserved

EMV Chip Card Basics


How to Use an EMV Chip Card

Via: NerdWallet

FirstCU Online Security

FirstCU Online Security

Multi-factor authentication and layered security are helping assure safer transactions for you and our members. Help us to protect you. You may be asked to provide answers to three CHALLENGE QUESTIONS when signing on to FirstCU Online Account Access. If you access your online account from another computer than where you originally signed-on (for some members this could be work or a public computer), you will be prompted to answer one of your challenge questions. This is for your safety, so that we authenticate that the person signing into your account is actually you. This is a multi-factor level of security authorization in addition to your User ID and your Password for your account security. We thank you for your attention to this request.

Guidance for Online Protection

Online Security is a Top Priority for you and for your credit union. If you use online or mobile account access, you will be interested to know what we do to protect you and what you can do to help.

Security Factors

Online security begins with the authentication process, used to confirm that it is you and not someone else who is accessing your account. Authentication generally involves one or more basic factors:

— Something that the user knows (such as a password or PIN)

— Something that the user has (such as your ATM or debit card)

— Something that the user is (such as a fingerprint)

Single factor authentication uses one of these methods; multi-factor authentication uses more than one and is considered a stronger fraud deterrent. For example, when you use your ATM card, you are utilizing multi-factor authentication: factor one is something that you have which is your card and factor two is something that you know which is your PIN.

Layered Security

To assure your continued security online, your credit union uses both single and multi-factor authentication, and additional "layered security" measures as appropriate. Layered security is characterized by the use of different controls at different points in a transaction process so that a weakness in one control is generally compensated for by the strength in another. One example of this would be that you follow one process to log in (user and password) and then give additional information if there is any question about this authentication and to authorize funds transfers.

The purpose of these layers is to allow your credit union to authenticate members and detect and respond to suspicious activity related to initial login, and then to reconfirm this authentication when further transactions involve the transfer of funds to other parties.

Internal Assessments

First Service has conducted a comprehensive risk-assessment of its current methods as recommended in the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council's supervisory guidance. These risk assessments consider, for example:

  • Changes in the internal and external threat environment
  • Changes in the member base adopting electronic banking
  • Changes in the member functionality offered through electronic banking
  • Actual incidents of security breaches, identity theft, or fraud

Whenever an increased risk to your transaction security may warrant, your credit union will be able to conduct additional verification procedures or layers of control, which may include: utilizing call back voice verification, employing member verification procedures, analyzing banking transactions to identify suspicious patterns, and establishing dollar limits that require manual intervention.

Reg E Protections

Credit unions follow specific rules for electronic transactions that are issued by the Federal Reserve Board, known as Regulation E which cover different situations revolving around transfers made electronically. Under the consumer protections provided under Reg E, you can recover Internet banking losses according to how soon you detect and report them. Here is what the federal rules require: if you report the losses within two days of receiving your statement, you can be liable for the first $50; after two days, the amount increases to $500 and after 60 days you can be legally liable for the full amount. These protections can be modified by state law or by internal reporting policies at your credit union so be sure to ask your credit union how these protections apply to your particular situation.

First Line of Defense is You

Understanding the risks and knowing how fraudsters might trick you is a critical step in protecting yourself online. You can make your computer safer by installing and updating your:

  • Anti-virus software
  • Anti-malware programs
  • Firewalls
  • Operating system patches and updates
Fraud Alerts

FRAUD ALERTS

The purpose of fraud is to get the consumer to provide confidential information, such as account numbers, passwords and social security numbers. The perpetrator then uses this information to gain access to an individual’s bank and credit card accounts.

Call us at (614) 836-0100 (local) or 1-800-241-4575 (out-of-area) if you need assistance or think your First Service account has been compromised.  A Member Service Representative will get you to the person responsible for handling your concern.

Beware of Unsolicited Contacts By Phone, Text or E-mail.

  • Never release personal or account information to unsolicited e-mail, telephone calls or text messages.
  • Keep your checks, plastic cards, and personal identification number(s) secure.
  • Do not wire funds to unknown contacts.
  • Sign up for online account access at FirstCU Online.

Be Safe With These Tips:

  • Beware of e-Mails (phishing)
    • Impostors can create fake web sites - down to the logo. If you get an e-mail that asks you to go to a web site and input personal details, ignore it! No bank, credit card company or your credit union will send an e-mail asking for this information.
    • Do not open e-mails, click on embedded links or open attachments from unknown senders. First Service will not contact you for personal information, or to verify information, by e-mail.
    • You can make your computer safer by installing and updating regularly your anti-virus software, anti-malware programs, firewalls, and operating system patches and updates.
  • Watch Your Mail
    • Thieves can nab your statement, a credit card bill or other valuable information and change the address hoping you won't notice. Statements arrive on a regular cycle; if yours doesn't arrive, let the company know. We provide free online e-Statements to help protect our members from mail fraud.
  • Guard Your Social Security Number
    • A zillion places will request your social security number, but you don't have to tell them. Who is entitled to know? Your employer, the DMV, your credit union or bank and the IRS.
  • Cell Phones & Text Messages
    • Do not respond to cell phone text messages from unknown sources. Thieves will send out text messages looking for personal information.

Report any suspicious scams, telephone numbers or e-mail addresses to your local or federal law enforcement agencies and the FTC at https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov.

Even though card security may contact you to verify a specific transaction you have made, you will not be asked by phone, text or e-mail for your account information, card information, your personal identification number (PIN) or your social security number. Visa, MasterCard and First Service have this information on file. If you receive such a call, text or e-mail, call the business direct at their published number to verify the call. For First Service accounts, dial local 614-836-0100 or long distance 1-800-241-4578 for a Member Service Representative.

Examples of RECENT SCAMS:

  • The FBI issued an alert about a new scam. This is an email you receive which threatens to make public all your private personal information, unless you pay a ransom in an electronic currency called Bitcoin.  It is easy to get intimidated by threats like this, and you might be pushed into trying to prevent possible negative consequences. However, do not fall for pressure tactics like this, because if you do, your data will be sold to other scammers who will continue to haunt you.  If you receive email extortion demands, do not answer, and do not pay anything. Report this scam to the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) at http://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx.  Remember... Always Think Before You Click!
  • Here is a recent VISA scam, but this could be from MasterCard or another provider as well. The call has the appearance of being from VISA Security and Fraud Department. The difference with this Scam from others is that the caller has most of the information, which they provide to the Cardholder (instead of asking for information), and then they ask you to verify that the card is in your possession. To verify this, the caller will ask you to provide the numbers from the back of your card. That is the "missing piece of information" that the caller needs to use the card fraudulently. DO NOT PROVIDE THE CARD NUMBERS from the back of your card!  Instead, tell them you'll call VISA (or MasterCard) directly for verification of the conversation and HANG UP!
  • A Member reported an "advertisement" on the First Service web site. We DO NOT sell ad space on our web site. This is a virus from a program on your computer and is not embedded in our site. DO NOT RESPOND to the ad.
  • Advertisements have been posted on Craigslist as part of member recruitment scams nationwide. The ads solicit current credit union members and offer $75.00 or more for their assistance in gaining membership for ineligible individuals. This Is a SCAM targeting credit unions and members across the country!
  • An IRS scam asks you to respond to them concerning your last tax return. This is fraud. DO NOT REPLY. The IRS will not ask you to verify information by e-mail or text.
  • If you are contacted and asked to provide credit union account information to verify your home or auto insurance, DO NOT REPLY! Instead, call your insurance agent at their direct number.

Legitimate Card Protection Service

BEWARE! Even though a Card Protection Service may call, a legitimate service representative will only ask you to verify a specific transaction. They will never ask you to provide personal, account, or card information. If this is your credit union or Visa or MasterCard security, they already have this information.

Safety Tip: Remember, if something seems too good to be true, it probably is.  You can check out the web site www.lookstoogoodtobetrue.com for "too good to be true" situations.

Review Credit Reports at Least Once a Year.
This will help you ensure fraudulent accounts have not been opened using your personal information. Additionally, the Fair Credit Reporting Act entitles consumers to a free credit report once a year from each of the three nationwide credit reporting agencies. Members can receive their report by contacting the credit reporting agencies directly or by visiting www.annualcreditreport.com.

Monitor Financial Statements and Online Banking Regularly.
Get into the routine of regularly checking your statements, reviewing your account transactions, and online activities. This will help identify unauthorized account activities early, preventing potential losses to your personal accounts.

Ensure Children Understand What Information to Provide Online.
Fraudsters will often use a game or a free offer that will request personal information, or will include spy ware to track and steal information from your computer or mobile device. Parents can protect themselves by encouraging their children to limit online contact to friends they actually know, setting privacy controls to restrict access to private information, and enabling parental controls that allow access to only trusted sites.  Talk to your children about not giving out their name, address, date of birth, or any other personal information online without talking to a parent or trusted adult first.

Beware of Downloading Sneaky Apps.
Smart phone or social networking applications may provide application developers with access to your personal information, such as messages, contacts, e-mails and photos. Often, this information isn't related to the application's purpose. Instead developers may share member's information with marketers or other third parties. Consumers should read the privacy policy of each application before downloading to understand what private information they are sharing.

Shred Documents with Personal and Financial Information.
Financial statements, credit card offers and billing statements are examples of documents that should be shredded.

Look Out for Scams Involving Social Engineering.
Fraudsters may impersonate a credit union (or other legitimate organizations) to trick consumers into giving out personal account information. This social engineering tactic is often utilized as part of an elaborate scheme involving phone calls, emails, text messages and other forms of communication. First Service will not ask you to verify account information by text, e-mail or pop-up messages. We will not ask you for sensitive information over unsecured communication channels.

Helpful Websites

Here are some other helpful sites where you can learn more about online safety and security. The Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency, has information to help consumers, businesses, and law enforcement officials safeguard personal information and to take action if an identity theft occurs.

www.ftc.gov/idtheft is a one-stop national resource to learn about the crime of identity theft. Consumers can learn how to avoid identity theft – and what to do if their identity is stolen. Businesses can learn to help their customers deal with identity theft and prevent problems in the first place. Law enforcement officials will find resources that help victims of identity theft.

www.YouTube.com/FTCVideos has short educational videos that help consumers learn more about identity theft, phishing, reducing spam, and protecting their computers against unwanted intrusions.

www.onguardonline.gov/games lets consumers test their cyber smarts with interactive games on everything from phishing and computer security to social networking and e-mail scams.

www.ftc.gov/freereports offers details about a consumer’s right to get a free copy of his or her credit report from each of the three national credit reporting companies, upon request, once every 12 months. Reviewing your credit report regularly is an effective way to deter and detect identity theft.

www.staysafeonline.com offers details about the dangers of cyber crime and how to protect yourself and your family.

www.mycreditunion.gov get advice and tips from consumer protection experts on keeping your money safe and making smart financial decisions.

U.S. Patriot Act

U.S. Patriot Act

The US Patriot Act is designed to help protect you, your family and our country from terrorism by providing appropriate tools to intercept and obstruct terrorist acts. In compliance with this law, First Service verifies the identity of members (as well as prospective members opening an account and non-members doing business with us) by requiring specific documents be kept on file. These documents are required for all new accounts, for existing members who are adding an additional account, when adding a signatory to an account, when executing loan documents and for all persons doing business on an account with us. We thank you for your understanding as we comply with these efforts to help maintain the security of our country.

Patriot Act Notification: To help the government fight the funding of terrorism and money laundering activities, federal law requires all financial institutions to obtain, verify, and record information that identifies each person who opens an account. When you open an account or do business with us, we will ask your name, address, date of birth, and other information that will allow us to identify you. We may also ask to see your driver's license or other identifying documents.

Federal Law: Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act
The Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006 and implementing regulations prohibit commercial members from receiving deposit or other credits of any kind relating to their operation of an illegal Internet gambling business. Under the Act, any person engaged in the business of betting or wagering (as defined by the statute) is prohibited from completing "restricted transactions," or knowingly accepting payments in connection with the participation of another person in unlawful Internet gambling.

First Service Federal Credit Union is required to enforce that prohibition.  It is the Policy of First Service Federal Credit Union not to open or maintain any account for commercial members held with the intent to conduct or engage in Internet gambling activity, whether legal or illegal. If the credit union discovers or determines that an existing commercial member transacts or engages in Internet gambling activity as defined by the UIGEA, the credit union reserves the right to restrict services or terminate the account relationship.

This CREDIT UNION IS FEDERALLY INSURED BY THE NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION.
Your federal savings insurance coverage at First Service has increased to $250,000. Funds in your Individual Retirement Account are insured separate from and in addition to the $250,000 general share insurance rules.

For additional information on your account insurance coverage, please call First Service at 614/836-0100, the NCUA Insurance Call Center at 1-800-755-1030, ext. 1 or visit www.ncua.gov/shareinsurance/index.htm where you will also find an easy e-Calculator to calculate your insurance coverage.
Bauer Financial Services has given First Service a 5-STAR rating for Safety and Soundness. To see more click here.